Sugar Land's crime rate is at an all-time low

2020 Crime Rate graphic

Sugar Land’s crime rate for 2020 was the lowest on record.   

“Despite the hardships and major changes of this year, the Sugar Land Police Department has maintained excellent service to our residents,” said Robins. “COVID changed a lot about how we operate. While we saw a decrease in things like traffic stops and calls for service, SLPD increased visibility at spaces like grocery stores and parks. I am proud of the work that our department has put into making Sugar Land one of the safest cities to live in.”

The results were included in the Sugar Land Police Department’s 2020 Annual Report, including: 

  • Sugar Land’s crime rate decreased 26 percent from 2019 to 2020. The rate is 60 percent lower than the state average and 57 percent lower than the national average for 2019.
  • Sugar Land’s violent crime rate decreased 4 percent from 2019 to 2020. The rate is 60 percent lower than the state average and 57 percent lower than the national average for 2019.
  • Sugar Land’s property crime rate decreased 27 percent from 2019 to 2020.  The rate is 56 percent lower than the state average and 50 percent lower than the national average for 2019.

The state and national crime rates for 2020 have not yet been released. Sugar Land’s 2019 data was derived from the Texas Department of Public Safety’s (DPS) Crime in Texas 2019 report.  

The overall crime rate is comprised of Part 1 crimes that include homicides, sexual assaults, robberies, aggravated assaults, burglaries, thefts and auto thefts. Based on statistics published by DPS, Sugar Land ranked as the fourth safest city in Texas with a population between 100,00-150,000. Of the top five cities, Sugar Land had the lowest violent crime rate.    

Sugar Land Police Chief Eric Robins credits resiliency, community partnerships, public education, a commitment to technology, training and departmental leadership for Sugar Land’s historically low crime rate.  

Analysis from the report shows that assaults are down 4 percent from 2019, while aggravated assaults are up 29 percent and family violence is up 12 percent. Traffic stops saw a 35 percent decrease from 31,935 to 20,826. 

Mental health calls are up from 922 in 2019 to 1,126 in 2020; a majority of this increase occurred after July. The department is combating this upward trend by partnering with local hospitals and mental health authorities to provide resources for residents. Additionally, the department is enhancing crisis intervention training.  

Priorities for 2021 include:

  • expanding the crime prevention camera program;
  • evaluating drones; 
  • enhancing the police training program; 
  • improving the public safety training facility; 
  • increasing visibility, including bike patrols;
  • planning for succession and leadership development; and 
  • improving communication with residents.